Identity Theft

Identity theft refers to the act of accessing and acquiring elements a another person's identity (i.e. name, date of birth, billing address, etc.) in order to commit identity fraud. Identity theft can take place whether the victim is alive or deceased. Once a person’s identity data is obtained, the data can be monetized by gaining access to their accounts, stealing their resources or obtaining their credit and other benefits. Identity theft (in combination with, and often used interchangeably with, identity fraud) is one of the fastest-growing crimes globally. A criminal can also use stolen identity information to hijack a consumer accounts, commonly referred to as "account takeover".


InfoSec (Information Security)

InfoSec, short for Information Security, refers to the discipline of defending information from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, disruption, modi cation, perusal, inspection, recording or destruction.


Internal Fraud (Insider Fraud)

Internal fraud occurs when an employee makes a false representation, fails to disclose information, or abuses a position of trust either for personal gain or to cause losses to others. Internal fraud can range from compromising customer or payroll data to inflating expenses to petty theft. Often referred to as occupational fraud, these schemes can be planned or unplanned and opportunistic or linked to organized criminal networks. When more than one employee is involved in the scheme, it is referred to as collusion and the average losses to the organization are greater.


Investment Fraud

Investment fraud is any scheme or deception relating to investments that affect a person or company. Investment fraud includes illegal insider trading, fraudulent stock manipulation, prime bank investment schemes and hundreds of other types of financial scams.


Issuer (Issuing Bank)

The Issuing Bank is the financial institution which issues individuals with credit cards or debit cards and extends short-term lines of credit to purchase goods and services. Familiar issues include Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Citibank and The issuer settles card transactions for the purchaser or card holder whereas its counterpart the acquiring bank or merchant acquirer, is the bank that is responsible for settling credit and debit card transactions on behalf of the merchant. Issuers generally manage the credit and debit card programs on behalf of the card networks, such as Visa and Mastercard, and for their role in the card payment process, receive the majority of the interchange and other fees in a credit card and debit card transaction. Discover and American Express are both issuers and card networks.